Not That Blonde...

Ask me anything   Nerdfighter here. Trying to decrease world suck and increase awesome. At Villanova having a grand time. Really love my boyfriend, Matthew, and am so proud of him. Family and friends focused, Christ centered.

Uhhh…everything’s under control.  Situation normal.

(Source: leiaorrgana, via skywalkerss)

— 5 hours ago with 833 notes
effyeahnerdfighters:

fishingboatproceeds:


Shailene Woodley wrote about John Green for Time’s “The 100 Most Influential People,” 2014 [link]. 

1. I am so thrilled to have been named to the 2014 TIME 100. Shai’s essay is so kind and generous. That sentence about planets and moons is a lovely goal for us all to reach toward. Now, that said, I’m no prophet. I’m a guy who not too long ago tried to wax his chin. 
2. Do I really look like that illustration?

Congratulations, John!

effyeahnerdfighters:

fishingboatproceeds:

Shailene Woodley wrote about John Green for Time’s “The 100 Most Influential People,” 2014 [link]. 

1. I am so thrilled to have been named to the 2014 TIME 100. Shai’s essay is so kind and generous. That sentence about planets and moons is a lovely goal for us all to reach toward. Now, that said, I’m no prophet. I’m a guy who not too long ago tried to wax his chin

2. Do I really look like that illustration?

Congratulations, John!

(Source: shailenewoodleysource)

— 10 hours ago with 21561 notes
nutrifitblr:

I really love this quote. Good reminder :)

nutrifitblr:

I really love this quote. Good reminder :)

(via fit-ish)

— 10 hours ago with 13746 notes
mindblowingscience:

Mantis shrimp stronger than airplanes: Composite material inspired by shrimp stronger than standard used in airplane frames
Image above: Helicoidal structure of the mantis shrimp club.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of California - Riverside

Inspired by the fist-like club of a mantis shrimp, a team of researchers led by University of California, Riverside, in collaboration with University of Southern California and Purdue University, have developed a design structure for composite materials that is more impact resistant and tougher than the standard used in airplanes.
"The more we study the club of this tiny crustacean, the more we realize its structure could improve so many things we use every day," said David Kisailus, a Kavli Fellow of the National Academy of Science and the Winston Chung Endowed Chair of Energy Innovation at the UC Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering.
The peacock mantis shrimp, or stomatopod, is a 4- to 6-inch-long rainbow-colored crustacean with a fist-like club that accelerates underwater faster than a 22-calibur bullet. Researchers, led by Kisailus, an associate professor of chemical engineering, are interested in the club because it can strike prey thousands of times without breaking.
The force created by the impact of the mantis shrimp’s club is more than 1,000 times its own weight. It’s so powerful that Kisailus needs to keep the animal in a special aquarium in his lab so it doesn’t break the glass. Also, the acceleration of the club creates cavitation, meaning it shears the water, literally boiling it, forming cavitation bubbles that implode, yielding a secondary impact on the mantis shrimp’s prey.

Previous work by the researchers, published in the journal Science in 2012, found the club is composed of several regions, including an endocuticle region. This region is characterized by a spiraling arrangement of mineralized fiber layers that act as shock absorber. Each layer is rotated by a small angle from the layer below to eventually complete a 180-degree rotation.

In a paper “Bio-Inspired Impact Resistant Composites,” just published online in the journal Acta Biomaterialia, the researchers applied that spiraled, or helicoidal, layered design when creating carbon fiber-epoxy composites. Composites with this design structure could be used for a variety of applications, including aerospace and automotive frames, body armor and football helmets.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Mantis shrimp stronger than airplanes: Composite material inspired by shrimp stronger than standard used in airplane frames

Image above: Helicoidal structure of the mantis shrimp club.

Credit: Image courtesy of University of California - Riverside

Inspired by the fist-like club of a mantis shrimp, a team of researchers led by University of California, Riverside, in collaboration with University of Southern California and Purdue University, have developed a design structure for composite materials that is more impact resistant and tougher than the standard used in airplanes.

"The more we study the club of this tiny crustacean, the more we realize its structure could improve so many things we use every day," said David Kisailus, a Kavli Fellow of the National Academy of Science and the Winston Chung Endowed Chair of Energy Innovation at the UC Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering.

The peacock mantis shrimp, or stomatopod, is a 4- to 6-inch-long rainbow-colored crustacean with a fist-like club that accelerates underwater faster than a 22-calibur bullet. Researchers, led by Kisailus, an associate professor of chemical engineering, are interested in the club because it can strike prey thousands of times without breaking.

The force created by the impact of the mantis shrimp’s club is more than 1,000 times its own weight. It’s so powerful that Kisailus needs to keep the animal in a special aquarium in his lab so it doesn’t break the glass. Also, the acceleration of the club creates cavitation, meaning it shears the water, literally boiling it, forming cavitation bubbles that implode, yielding a secondary impact on the mantis shrimp’s prey.

Previous work by the researchers, published in the journal Science in 2012, found the club is composed of several regions, including an endocuticle region. This region is characterized by a spiraling arrangement of mineralized fiber layers that act as shock absorber. Each layer is rotated by a small angle from the layer below to eventually complete a 180-degree rotation.

In a paper “Bio-Inspired Impact Resistant Composites,” just published online in the journal Acta Biomaterialia, the researchers applied that spiraled, or helicoidal, layered design when creating carbon fiber-epoxy composites. Composites with this design structure could be used for a variety of applications, including aerospace and automotive frames, body armor and football helmets.

Continue Reading.

(via nanodash)

— 12 hours ago with 110 notes

jaaaaaaawn:

methdragon:

be there or 

image

That square is 5 bees by 6 bees I’ll have you know that is a bee rectangle you have failed

(via diagonalleybound)

— 14 hours ago with 147629 notes
"If you love deeply, you’re going to get hurt badly. But it’s still worth it."
C.S Lewis   (via thechristopherglen)

(Source: narnia--freak, via comeholyspirit)

— 22 hours ago with 84739 notes
"The loneliest moment in someone’s life is when they are watching their whole world fall apart, and all they can do is stare blankly."
F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (via monsieurarlequin)

(via comeholyspirit)

— 22 hours ago with 243 notes
rachaeldee:

wild thing from high side plank:
begin in high side plank with all your weight in your supporting arm and leg. 
bend and lift your top leg while also lifting your hips high.
 plant the reaching foot solidly and shift your weight. 
reach the leg back and as your hips twist, stretch your top arm high and use your supporting arm to push your hips up even higher and into the backbend - all weight should be in your initial supporting arm and the leg that reached back.
 from here you can hold and then put weight in your reaching arm to shift into full wheel pose. 

rachaeldee:

wild thing from high side plank:

  • begin in high side plank with all your weight in your supporting arm and leg.
  • bend and lift your top leg while also lifting your hips high.
  • plant the reaching foot solidly and shift your weight.
  • reach the leg back and as your hips twist, stretch your top arm high and use your supporting arm to push your hips up even higher and into the backbend - all weight should be in your initial supporting arm and the leg that reached back.
  • from here you can hold and then put weight in your reaching arm to shift into full wheel pose. 

(via fit-ish)

— 22 hours ago with 1192 notes
comeholyspirit:

humansofnewyork:

"It’s important to forgive.""Who do you have the hardest time forgiving?""Myself."


BUT YOU’RE CUTE AND LITTLE AND OLD YOU DON’T DO ANYTHING WRONGGGGGGG

comeholyspirit:

humansofnewyork:

"It’s important to forgive."
"Who do you have the hardest time forgiving?"
"Myself."

BUT YOU’RE CUTE AND LITTLE AND OLD YOU DON’T DO ANYTHING WRONGGGGGGG

— 23 hours ago with 14538 notes
"

If you love and get hurt, love more.

If you love more and hurt more, love even more.

If you love even more and get hurt even more, love some more until it hurts no more.

"
William Shakespeare (via ineffable-girl)
— 1 day ago with 177 notes